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A New Paradigm… by Nancy Brophy

I am always fascinated by the dichotomy of my local RWA chapter members. One would imagine that published or not, a writer’s main focus would be writing. For some that is true. But everyone comes with their own agenda and writing is not necessarily number one. This is a mixed blessing.

RWA runs on volunteers who help at the expense of their writing time. Sometimes that is purposeful. But many – like me – simply raised a hand at the wrong moment. And while my mouth is saying, “Yes, I’d be happy to.” My brain is screaming, “Are you an idiot? You don’t have any free time?”

Lots of RWA members talk about writing more than they actually sit in a chair and put words on paper. I used to be disdainful. I was wrong. My tunnel vision didn’t let me see opportunities that others saw. Our chapter now includes agents, editors, graphic artists who do cover designs, copy editors, many of whom started out as writers. Many of whom still find time to write.

I love the line in RWA’s membership requirements that says (I’m paraphrasing) you must be purpose driven to write romance. Yeah, right. Without the people who operate on the fringes it wouldn’t be the well-rounded organization it has become. Let’s face it even the girls scouts do more than sell cookies.

Which brings me to the real purpose of this week’s blog – my friend, Lynn Jordan. Lynn writes, but that’s not her main focus.

2Lynn

Lynn is social media savvy and has a website called Authors Tool Blog where she teaches courses and offers materials on increasing your Internet market share. It is simple and easy to use which is important info to the techno challenged among us. Like me.

But recently she’s started a new site called I Love Romance Books.  If you follow this on Facebook, every day Lynn posts several romance books that are either free or on sale. As a result I have read a lot of Indie published authors that I might not have noticed.

As won’t surprise you, she includes the good, bad and occasionally the ugly. She includes comments on what reviewers have said and posts a large enough variety that I can skip those genres I don’t particularly enjoy. I know this is bad to admit, but I’m really tired of vampires. (Sorry to all my friends who write paranormal).

I now have enough books on Kindle that I’ve started sorting them the same way I did with paperbacks. There is a keeper shelf. A DNF (did not finish) shelf and a good – would read more of that author shelf. But the unexpected benefit is that it makes me aware of author’s names which is one of the chief ways people actually choose who they read.

I think Lynn’s idea is brilliant. She, more than almost anyone I know, is promoting romance writers and I suspect is not making any money from her endeavor which would have many of us say why  bother? It is people like Lynn who are figuring out how to maneuver in the new era of publishing.

You go, girl.

Pitching at Nationals by Cassiel Knight

I wrote this for the PRO Bootcamp on all things RWA Nationals coming up at the end of July in Anaheim. Are you going? This will be my last one for a while so I’m going to make the most of it. Anyway, I thought I’d share the post I wrote about pitching at Nationals. And while the focus is Nationals, much of the pitching advice is the same anywhere. 

While pitching is stressful overall, pitching at Nationals is easily the most feared. And why wouldn’t it be? You are in a huge room filled with agents and editors, your future ‘employers’, and are surrounded by your competition. With over 100 in the room at one time, the large room is loud and full of distractions.

Not a very positive way to start off a post is it?

But don’t worry. It is nerve-wracking to pitch at Nationals–I’m not going to lie to you and say it’s a piece of cake. For some it is. For others, the stomach starts turning and doesn’t stop even after you’ve walked away from the tables.

As a veteran pitcher and volunteer at the agent/editor pitch sessions, I’m here to teach you the things you can do to make it less stressful. I encourage those of you who have pitched at Nationals to come for and share your experiences and tips since we all have different ways of approaching these.

To start, let me tell you a little about what you can expect.

For the room and set up, both are often different from conference to conference. It usually means a large room for pitching and some kind of holding area. The holding area can be a separate room like it was last year, or in the same huge area like it was the year before.

Anyway, while the set-up is different, the process is the same. The agents and editors are seated at small tables in rows throughout the room. They are usually scheduled for their times in alphabetical order by first name or last name (that keeps changing but you’ll know when you get there . For example, there may be five rows with six agents and editors in each row.

When you arrive, on time! and at least 10 minutes before your session, you’ll check in and be directed to a holding area with others pitching at the same time and in the same row.

At some point, usually about 3-5 minutes before your time, you’ll be lined up based on your time and row. For example, your row contains five agents/editors: Elizabeth, Joe, John, Mary, Laura. Your pitch is to Mary. You’ll be lined up in the fourth row.

When time is called for the people before you, you’ll be directed to start walking to your row. Follow the instructions and you’ll find Mary. Then it’s time to sit down and do your thing.

At the end of the session, you’ll leave and at this point, you can go see if you can get in another pitch with someone else or come back at another time and the process starts again, or you can leave and enjoy the rest of the conference.

Sounds pretty easy doesn’t it? It is. Just pay attention to the instructions–the RWA office staff in charge of this portion of Nationals has also done this for years.

Here are some tips and insights I’ve gathered from these three years of Nationals observing conference attendees and talking to the agents and editors.

* Wear comfortable clothes. If that is dressing up for you, go for it. Whatever makes you comfortable. If it’s jeans, do it. There are a lot of schools of thought on this but from what I see, as long as you are neat, clean and presentable, it doesn’t matter if you were are in a suit, dress or jeans. When you are comfortable, that will shine through. That’s what is important.

* Be on time! I noted this above. Seriously, be on time. I know there are a lot of things going on at Nationals. I get it. Everyone gets it. It’s not an excuse and it will NOT save your appointment time. I understand and appreciate that you may have to give up something you want to do to make your appointment. I say it’s your job. Just like (I hope) you wouldn’t be late to job interview, your wedding or the birth of your child <grin>, don’t be late for your pitch appointment.

What’s the worst that can happen? You won’t get your chance in front of the agent/editor you’re dying to see that just might want you and your story. Someone could pop on here and say that they missed their appointment but were still able to meet the agent/editor. That’s great. But why take the chance?  I can’t stress this enough. If you are late, you will lose your spot.  The staff works hard to ensure it goes off smoothly–if you aren’t there, someone else gets your slot. Don’t do that to yourself; be on time.

* While you are in the holding area, be mindful of the noise volume. Even though, most often, the waiting room is separate from the main area, it can get very loud. When you are sitting in front of your E/A, the last thing you want is to be distracted by the talking and laughing from the waiting room. Keep that in mind when you are waiting. I’m not saying be silent; I’m saying moderation.

* Don’t forget to smile and introduce yourself when you sit down with the E/A. It makes everything seem more human and is a good way to establish rapport. Others may disagree with me on this but don’t hand them your business card right away. What if they don’t ask for material? Just wait until the end. Another thing, and I believe it was mentioned earlier, there are two things to make your business card stand out for the E/A: 1) Blank backside or, instead of that, 2) your story’s  tagline on the back. I’ve heard from several E/As that they like to either jot notes on the blank side to jog their memories of enticing pitches or your tagline will do the same thing.

Oh, and a note on bringing material. Sigh. I’ve seen and heard it done successfully but in 90% of the cases, don’t bring or hand them material. If you feel you must, have it with you and if they ask, only then, hand it out. More times than not, they aren’t going to ask. They don’t need the paper. I know Nationals, at New York, was different last year and some asked for material on site. But they were local. Most of them aren’t going to be this year. And the good thing about email, is you can simply email the material later. I did that last year. I met, informally, with an agent and she asked for my full. Obviously, I didn’t have it with me, but I emailed it to her when I got back to my room. The same thing can hold true for a requested partial.

* Keep your actual pitch short. You get 10 minutes but don’t fill it up with the pitch. Give the E/A plenty of time to ask questions, at least three minutes. Who knows? With that extra time, your answer may be what they use to ask for more. And you want to leave time for that too. Because there are a bunch of us whose job is to boot pitchers from their seats and I hate to do that. So, be respectful of the person coming behind you and leave plenty of time for you to get those all important request instructions.

On another note, I know it’s tempting to rattle on and on about your book trying to pack in as much story as you can but resist doing that. Even if the E/A is silent and you are nervous. It’s a well-known technique that interviewers use that if they are silent long enough, the interviewees will ultimately say something that will rule them out. Now, I’m not saying that the E/As do that. But don’t leave yourself open for that to happen. I’ve seen it. It’s sad.

* Practice your pitch as much as you can so it sounds smooth but don’t fret if you find yourself having to read from your cards. Try not to, but don’t worry if you have to. I’ve heard from E/As on both sides–some think it means you don’t know your story well enough while others understand you are nervous so they are okay with you reading. If you keep your pitch short and concise, you should be able to memorize it enough. Keep your cards available in case your nervousness gets to be too much.

* This is a big one and believe me, the E/As see this happening. It’s not always possible to, by the time you signed up, get the E/A you really wanted (hooray for you if you did). Hopefully, you’ve done your research and gotten someone else who might be a fit. You will get an opportunity to find open slots with other E/As. Be smart about it and don’t just pitch to any E/A that’s on the list. As I said, I’ve volunteered extensively at Nationals the last few years and I’ve seen those who flit from E/A to E/A with no apparent method to this madness. I noticed it. And believe me, the E/As do. Not in a good way, either. To them, it means you haven’t taken the time to make sure you are pitching your story to the one who it fits best. Sure, sometimes it isn’t always easy to know but do the best you can. Take those extra pitches but take them smartly. Don’t throw pasta against the wall and hope it sticks.

Pitching is done. Now what? Short and sweet. Take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back or seek your friends to do that for you, and above all, if you get a request SEND IT IN! Yes, I put this in all caps for a reason.

A variety of E/As tell me that over 80% of their requests they never see. Never. And another 10% could come in a year later. Their manners dictate they will go ahead and take a look at it but the likelihood that they still want it is slim. I’m not saying it doesn’t happen but it is rare. So, send it in. Take time to polish it but send it in at least three months of Nationals.

Hope you’ve found this useful. If you have questions about anything I’ve missed, don’t hesitate to post a question.

Guest Author Interview: Cathryn Cade …by Susan Lute

Cathryn Cade writes red hot romance, with action, danger, and laughter. Her newest series is set on the lovely Hawaiian Island (her Hawaiian Heroes covers are to die for). She lives in the Pacific Northwest, and LOVES to write romance. You can find her at her website, Cathryn’s Blog, Twitter, Facebook, and Night Owl Romance. Welcome Cathryn!

Tell us about your publishing journey. First, a big thank you to the Janes for hosting me on their blog. It’s an exciting time for all these ladies with new publications to celebrate! I’m so thrilled to join them here.

I’ve been a writer as long as I can remember. Guess I’ve always had the compulsion to tweak reality–wrap it up with a happy ending. Once I started reading romance, I began to imagine different endings to stories, or different outcomes to certain scenes. I played around like this for years, until in 2007 I learned of RWA, and found there was a chapter right across the river from me–in Portland. At my first meeting someone mentioned online publishing, and an up-&-coming publisher called Samhain Publishing. I went home to our computer and looked at their submission calls. One was for ‘shape-shifter’ stories … and I wrote Tyger, Tyger, Burning Bryght, still my best-selling book. It was so successful I wrote three more stories in The Orion Series. I’m still a bit flum-ozzled that I ended up writing space opera, but it just seemed the best genre for a red hot shape-shifter story.

What’s the funniest thing to happen to you along your road to publication and what was the most exciting? The most exciting thing that’s happened on my road is quite recent. Any time an author goes in a different direction, she’s not sure readers will follow. I have a new red hot paranormal romance series, Hawaiian Heroes, debuting April 10, set in contemporary Hawaii. Book 1, Walking in Fire has been garnering very positive reviews, and I’m thrilled. Library Journal says ‘my fans will not be disappointed‘, and Night Owl Reviews gave the story a Top Pick.

I think the funniest thing has been related to reviews, also. My first book received a few reviews (this was in 2009, when some Amazon customers evidently weren’t sure of how to ascertain a book’s heat level) where the readers complained of the erotic nature of the love scenes. ‘Smut, smut, smut‘ has to be my personal favorite. I believe most readers now have the hang of reading the excerpt and blurb, ’cause I haven’t received any more of those comments.

What has been the most challenging thing related to publishing you’ve had to deal with on your journey? Realizing that not every reader is going to love my stories as much as I do, and as much as others do. And that they have the right to voice their opinions, sometimes very emphatically. Interestingly enough, however, Tyger has been my most polarizing book–it has been a best-seller on some of the big sites, and also garnered some of the most emphatically negative reviews. Shrugging.

Who is your favorite author, and what are you currently reading? Jayne Anne Krentz is one of my go-to authors. I just finished her Canyons of Night–fabulous. Now I’m reading Larry Brooks’ Story Engineering, in my continuing search for ways to make my writing better and better. Writing is the hardest work I’ve ever done, and the most fulfilling.

What’s coming up next for you? Hawaiian Heroes, Book 2; Rolling in the Deep debuts July 31, 2012. This book continues the story of the Ho’omalu family and their Big Island. I’m currently researching and writing Book 3; Blooming in the Wild (working title).

After that, I believe I’ll be taking off for the future again with a paraquel trilogy in the world of The Orion. It will center around Logan Stark, the space magnate owner of The Orion and her sister ship.

A Rant: Craft is Not Just for New Writers by Cassiel Knight

I want to state one thing up front. I have absolutely nothing against self-publishing and while my rant is based on what I hear self-published authors say, I’ve also heard this from traditionally published authors. However, right now, the source of the rant comes from self-published, and you’ll see what I mean below.

Okay.

On one of the many loops I follow, I heard a recurring comment from members of RWA chapters throughout the country. I have to admit, when I first read the comment, my jaw dropped.

What I read, and others chimed in and agreed they heard, is that self-published authors are leaving local chapters because:

“they don’t need to learn craft anymore.”

Yes, that’s right. You heard me. There’s apparently this movement out there that is supposed to support the idea that because someone chooses to self-publish, it automatically means that the author’s writing is perfect. That they can’t learn anything else about craft.

Sorry folks, they are dead wrong.

I talked to a publisher about this and her jaw dropped too.  And you can go to any number of higly respected blogs like Dear Author.com and a common note in the comments is readers fear self-published books because of the poor writing.

That’s the reality, dear readers.  Choosing to self-publish or being a published author doesn’t mean you don’t need to continue to learn craft. In fact, for self-published authors, I think it means you need to work that much harder at times because you’ve chosen to go at it alone. You don’t have the luxury of an agent or editor back-up. It’s you.

You think I’m wrong? Well, here are some quotes from those you might believe:

  • Gina Ardito wrote a great blog post on this subject. She says: “A truly successful author seeks the new, the different, and dares to step to the edge of the precipice every single time. (S)he is always learning, always growing.” http://ginaardito.blogspot.com/2011/06/mid-week-rude-awakening-growth-is.html
  • Marie Andreas: “But for any author to say, “I know all there is to know about writing”- FOR any reason is insane!…We have to keep learning. This is true in darn near all fields, but especially a world like publishing. I would be horrified if the book I wrote five years ago is no different than one I just finished. As authors we have to keep pushing the envelope, learning new skills, trying new approaches – EVEN if we don’t stick with them. Try them, keep what works, then move on.” http://www.castlesandguns.com/2011/04/never-stop-learning.html
  • RITA Award winning author, Sophia Nash (http://www.sophianash.com): “I think writers grow and change, even if it is just in miniscule amounts, with each book they write. It’s only natural since the writing process is a learning experience. It’s what I like the most about the creative process. I’ll never get bored writing because I’ll never stop learning new things about the craft.”
  • Bob Mayer, Who Dares Wins Publishing (http://www.boymayer.org) – Always learn to become a better writer. 
  • James Scott Bell, bestselling suspense author and former fiction columnist for Writers Digest, says: “…never think that business knowledge and marketing can cover a multitude of writing sins. One still has to be able to consistently deliver the goods, and that means learning the craft by writing, revising, studying, getting feedback, and more writing.”
  • Robin Perini (http://www.robinperini.com) of Discovering Story Magic fame says: “I think that the most important piece of advice that I can give is to NEVER STOP LEARNING, and to BE OPEN TO GROWING and CHANGING.”
  • New York Bestselling Author Susan Mallery says: “Never Stop Learning.” She recommends that you master as much craft as you can so you don’t disappoint your readers. Figure out what you’re good at and what you’re bad at. Focus on your strengths and shore up your weaknesses. If you bring your passion and enthusiasm to a project, it will show up on the page. http://jennyhansenauthor.wordpress.com/2011/10/11/5-great-bits-of-wisdom-from-a-new-york-times-besteller/
  • Dean Wesley Smith – A self-published success story most who self-published know very well has this to say: “Learning and continuing to learn is critical. This business keeps changing and the only way to stay abreast of the changes is to go out and keep learning and talk with other writers and find advice that makes sense to you and your way. Go to workshops, conferences, conventions and anything else you can find to get bits of learning. Read everything you can find about the business. My goal on this is learn one thing new every week at least. I’ve been doing that since my early days and it has worked for me, and kept me focused on learning. Find what works for you…Keep learning. Keep practicing your art.”http://www.deanwesleysmith.com/?p=1311

So, the point of this rant is, next time you don’t think you have anything to learn from craft workshops, think again.

I suspect you do.

BTW – isn’t that little girl up there absolutely adorable? :-D

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